Apple AirTags: The F.A.A. is refusing to allow Apple AirTags to track checked baggage

Lufthansa Says Passengers Can’t Use Apple AirTags to Track Checked Bags The Federal Aviation Administration has said that passengers can’t use Apple AirTags to track checked baggage – and now the company that makes…

Apple AirTags: The F.A.A. is refusing to allow Apple AirTags to track checked baggage

Lufthansa Says Passengers Can’t Use Apple AirTags to Track Checked Bags

The Federal Aviation Administration has said that passengers can’t use Apple AirTags to track checked baggage – and now the company that makes them has weighed in. In a letter to the F.A.A., the team behind the AirTags company says that while they are not saying that they are forbidden, “Apple AirTags are not authorized by the F.A.A. for the tracking of checked baggage.”

AirTags, which was founded in New York in 2008, say they’re not going to provide a “blanket or general statement” that the F.A.A. will not allow the service. Their statement is simply that they are not telling the F.A.A. about Apple AirTags, and “there are no other products which will provide users with the same functionality or the same features, either currently or in the future, as Apple AirTags.”

While the company says that they won’t be able to do what AirFare and others have been trying to do – to track every checked bag – they say that their technology is different, because it uses radio tags that can only be read by radio waves rather than Wi-Fi. They also say that their technology allows for “the first-ever in-flight air marshals call-up that is 100 percent traceable.”

That’s pretty much what the F.A.A. told us yesterday, when we asked for more details on the issues. They weren’t ready to issue a blanket rule because there’s no clear way to define what constitutes tracking by radio without drawing upon their prior rulings. So they asked the company that makes the tags – called RFID, or radio frequency identification – to weigh in.

We’ve been getting lots of emails from readers asking for more details on the issue, and as of this writing, almost as many have called for it to be brought to a vote of public interest

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