California Department of Public Health Reports 38 percent Increase in New RSV Cases

California sees increase in RSV, a respiratory illness that can be dangerous for babies and adults. A report released Friday by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) said there had been a 38…

California Department of Public Health Reports 38 percent Increase in New RSV Cases

California sees increase in RSV, a respiratory illness that can be dangerous for babies and adults.

A report released Friday by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) said there had been a 38 percent increase in the number of confirmed RSV cases during the 2013-2014 school year, which ended Sept. 30.

California has been hit by an influx of hundreds of thousands of foreign visitors who come to the state for a short time to work or to visit relatives or friends.

Those who stay longer, especially the elderly, are encouraged to visit a local physician to be tested for RSV (formerly known as “common cold” because their symptoms mimic those of a cold).

“In 2013-2014 the numbers of visits to medical care were about 3 percent higher than in 2012-2013, and overall the number of children and adults with confirmed infections was about 3 percent higher,” reads a report on CDPH’s website.

RSV is a respiratory illness that can be deadly for people who are exposed to it. Babies and adults with the illness are at greater risk for respiratory failure and death.

The Department of Public Health has recommended that all doctors screen their patients for the virus.

The report also found the number of cases of RSV in California is still down from the previous year and from the previous two.

The report said there were 1,058 new confirmed cases of RSV during the 2013-2014 school year, with 733 reported in Sacramento County.

Sacramento County Public Health officials have not released the county’s numbers, but CDPH reports on the county’s website that the numbers are trending down from the previous year.

The report said the number of people coming into the state for a week or less is the highest it has been since the early 1990s.

The report also showed a sharp jump in the number of young children under the age of 6 months tested for

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