Nonimmigrant Alien Sponsorship

Domestic Fliers Will Need Real ID Compliant Identification in 2023 As the current immigration laws of the United States provide multiple layers to immigration enforcement, nonimmigrant aliens are at risk of being denied admission…

Nonimmigrant Alien Sponsorship

Domestic Fliers Will Need Real ID Compliant Identification in 2023 As the current immigration laws of the United States provide multiple layers to immigration enforcement, nonimmigrant aliens are at risk of being denied admission at the United States’s border with Mexico. The United States is committed to enforcing its immigration laws without regard to national origin or immigration status and to protecting the civil and legal rights of all people through a comprehensive and effective immigration enforcement system.

ID requirements now in place for nonimmigrant aliens

After the United States implemented a new, more robust, and uniform immigration system, it became necessary to adapt the nation’s laws, regulations, procedures, and policies to the new circumstances that were resulting from the implementation of a comprehensive immigration system. In January 2006, the United States revised its immigration laws with respect to certain nonimmigrant aliens. These new provisions include the requirement that nonimmigrant aliens must be issued a valid U.S. passport, which is required to conduct any business or other transactions involving an alien in that alien’s country of nationality or nationality. They also included the requirement that nonimmigrant aliens who seek to enter the United States at a port of entry at a time when the normal and customs inspection services of the United States are not available must produce proof of identity or proof of sponsorship from a qualified sponsor (such as a U.S. passport). See: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) Frequently Asked Questions for Nonimmigrant Aliens on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) website (accessed Oct. 25, 2010).

In recent years, many of the nation’s nonimmigrant alien populations, including those who cross the U.S.-Mexican border, have come to use the identification of their nonimmigrant alien sponsor to enter the United States and to prove their identity to U.S. immigration authorities. They must maintain their nonimmigrant alien sponsorship in order to remain in the United States with the permission of the United States. These nonimmigrant alien populations usually carry their nonimmigrant alien sponsorship (sometimes referred to as “entry documents” or “passport-of-entry documents”), along with other identification documents, when they enter the United States.

In order to continue living and working in the United States, they

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