Senate Campaign Team Trying to Show Voters It’s As Focused As Ever

Push comes to shove in closing days of 2022 Senate campaign beatdowns WASHINGTON – Senate Democrats don’t just want to help their Senate majority, they want to help Republicans. And Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.,…

Senate Campaign Team Trying to Show Voters It’s As Focused As Ever

Push comes to shove in closing days of 2022 Senate campaign beatdowns

WASHINGTON – Senate Democrats don’t just want to help their Senate majority, they want to help Republicans. And Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., wants to help himself by helping Republicans, according to people familiar with his strategy.

Last week, Warner joined Sens. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Chris Coons, D-Del., to announce that they will “vote on every important amendment that helps Republicans and Democrats do more for working families,” in the final three weeks of this year’s midterm election campaigns.

With the deadline quickly approaching, Warner’s Senate campaign team is trying to show voters the campaign in the closing days of the year is as focused as ever.

The campaign has a lot on its plate, from a fundraising blitz to fundraising in the primary contests against Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., next week and then Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., on the final day of the year.

The Senate campaign is also trying to show voters that the race is as unpredictable as ever. The campaign’s internal polling last week reported that they had a narrow lead over Warner, but that number dipped in the final week to a slight advantage for Warner, according to people familiar with the internal polling.

Warner, who is term-limited in January after finishing his last term early last year, is hoping to be able to run again for the seat.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., has run an aggressive campaign, and has raised a lot of money.

But Warner is also likely to face a stronger opponent in the race, especially under the new Senate rules, in which senators can run in four years and must face reelection at the same time.

The Senate campaign is trying to convince voters they have their ducks in a row when the Senate campaign is more competitive in 2020, the year Warner will have to move up and run against a more viable opponent than in 2018.

Warner told reporters last week that the campaign is hoping to see “as much political diversity as possible” in the Senate, which he said would be better for the country as a whole.

“We are trying to show how diverse the electorate is here in the United States Senate,” he said. “And we think

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