Texas Republicans Introduce Abortion Laws After Woman Goes Online and Starts Conversation With Man She Met Online

Why the C.E.O. Behind Match.com and Tinder Took a Stand on the Texas Abortion Law The C.E.O. of Match.com and Tinder took a stand against a Texas law criminalizing late-term abortions, but the anti-abortion…

Texas Republicans Introduce Abortion Laws After Woman Goes Online and Starts Conversation With Man She Met Online

Why the C.E.O. Behind Match.com and Tinder Took a Stand on the Texas Abortion Law

The C.E.O. of Match.com and Tinder took a stand against a Texas law criminalizing late-term abortions, but the anti-abortion rights groups that protested at Match.com and Tinder’s offices have left a trail of destruction in their wake.

Texas Republicans have introduced a slew of sweeping abortion restrictions — including a 21-hour waiting period to even hear if someone is pregnant and a “surgical ban” of any abortion past 20 weeks — after a woman went on the website and started a conversation with a man she met online.

As of the time of publication, the state’s abortion law was under the conservative Governor Greg Abbott’s desk, awaiting a final vote on the bill.

The woman, who identifies herself as a 35-year-old woman in Texas and who has since deleted her Facebook account, told The Huffington Post the man she was texting about her abortion ended up being a Match.com male executive, while she decided to terminate her pregnancy.

The Texas law criminalizes any abortion past 20 weeks, except for cases in which the mother’s life is at risk. For women who decide to carry to term despite complications, the law mandates a mandatory 24-hour waiting period.

As the Huffington Post previously reported, Texas is one of the most aggressively anti-abortion states, according to data from the Guttmacher Institute, which tracks abortion restrictions.

The Texas law is modeled after the federal one on the books, which banned abortions after 15 weeks of gestation, including abortions involving “serious risk of impairment of a major bodily function” and life of the mother.

Texas’s new abortion law was passed in response to the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt, which upheld the federal government’s previous restrictions on access to abortions, saying the Constitution does not impose an absolute bar on abortion when pregnancy is considered to be a life-threatening condition.

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