The 6.0-magnitude earthquake has a little-known “disaster area” 400 miles off the coast of Southern California

An ‘oddball’ 6.0 earthquake is recorded almost 800 miles off Southern California’s coast — but there’s no tsunami threat There’s no tsunami threat, but a 6.0-magnitude earthquake had a little-known “disaster area” 400 miles…

The 6.0-magnitude earthquake has a little-known “disaster area” 400 miles off the coast of Southern California

An ‘oddball’ 6.0 earthquake is recorded almost 800 miles off Southern California’s coast — but there’s no tsunami threat

There’s no tsunami threat, but a 6.0-magnitude earthquake had a little-known “disaster area” 400 miles off the coast. Here’s the official story.

A 6.0 magnitude earthquake, which came from the sea about 400 miles off the coast of Southern California Monday morning, was first detected around 5:08AM, according to the USGS.

The quake, which was a “strike-slip,” or fault-bending, earthquake, shook homes, damaged roads, toppled fences and buildings and caused the collapse of two trees near the coast. No tsunami threat was expected to be reported, however, the USGS said.

“The earthquake occurred at the sea surface on or near the western side of the Baja California Peninsula, the Pacific basin on the North American side of the U.S.-Mexico border,” the USGS said.

The earthquake’s location, and the Pacific basin, suggest another quake would be possible, or a tsunami could be reported, the USGS said early Tuesday morning.

Two earthquakes had previously rattled the region, one in July of 2018, and another in January of 2019.

In January, the USGS said a 6.7-magnitude earthquake had occurred a short distance north of San Diego. The quake, which was a “strike-slip”, damaged four homes, damaged an oil rig and caused the collapse of a tree close to shore. No tsunami threat was reported.

The USGS said in that January event, a 6.9-magnitude earthquake occurred less than half a mile north of La Mesa and a magnitude of 5.5 had occurred just to the west of Santa Barbara, the largest earthquake in Southern California in two years.

There were about 100 homes left off-shore that had been damaged, according to the USGS.

But there was no tsunami threat in either of the January incidents, according

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