The City of Toronto is asking to return to work

Toronto backtracks on return-to-office plans for city employees as Omicron spreads misinformation by Eric Hainey Toronto was aghast at news that the City of Toronto had made an agreement with two of its largest…

The City of Toronto is asking to return to work

Toronto backtracks on return-to-office plans for city employees as Omicron spreads misinformation

by Eric Hainey

Toronto was aghast at news that the City of Toronto had made an agreement with two of its largest unions to return to work on October 2. At least five municipalities across Ontario – including Peel – had made similar agreements before the election.

The City of Toronto (with a population greater than two million) was being asked to return to work by all three unions at the bargaining table. The city was also being asked by all three unions to participate in a voluntary national “sick-out” day. There were two conditions:

that a majority of all employees participated in the sick-out day would be required in Peel, and

that the city would not require either the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OES) or the Service Employees Union of B.C. (SEUBC) to provide the city with “fair shares” of all its sick-out day costs.

In other words, the city would not be required to take on any part of the sick-out-day costs on its own.

There were no reports in the media when the Toronto contract was brokered or the sick-out day proposed or, if they were made public, whether or not the “fair share” requirement would appear in the City of Toronto’s agreement with the OES and SEUBC.

So, just how is the City of Toronto being asked to participate in this sick-out?

This was the spin put out by the Ontario government and an Omicron spokesperson who claimed that the city had “pledged” to return to work.

When asked about the statement, Omicron issued the following statement:

“The City of Toronto has not made a formal agreement with any union or ratified a contract,” said Omicron head Paul

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