The First Day of Quarantine in Atlanta

Tell us your coming-out-of-pandemic isolation stories now, or better yet, how you’re navigating your quarantine life as a woman of color in tech. I wake up for my first day of quarantine in Atlanta….

The First Day of Quarantine in Atlanta

Tell us your coming-out-of-pandemic isolation stories now, or better yet, how you’re navigating your quarantine life as a woman of color in tech.

I wake up for my first day of quarantine in Atlanta.

I feel like I’m back at home, because this is the first time I’m back since we had to leave China for the coronavirus outbreak. I don’t feel scared or anxious about going to work or school today, just at home. I’m taking it pretty slowly and keeping to myself.

My colleague, who has the flu, is taking the day off, and the rest of the team is a bit more relaxed. This has been an exhausting few weeks so far. Our Slack is almost non-existent, all our communication is going through email, and our team is not even doing group hangouts.

I am a designer at Microsoft. In terms of personal space, we only have 1.5 square feet of office space. I am not allowed to even look out the windows without wearing a mask and a face-shield. I know I can’t go outside and chat with people, and I know that they will only tell me about it later.

After 20 minutes I’m just leaving for my first walk to get a fresh cup of coffee.

I’m going to make a little bit more noise, because this is the first time I’m back in the streets of Atlanta since the coronavirus outbreak. On Monday, the streets were filled with people and cars of all shapes and sizes, while today, they are still filled with people and cars, but not quite as many.

I’m about 10 minutes early for the workday, but my co-workers are already on the building and I’m left alone at a table in the hallway.

“Hi, my name is Sarah, and I’m going to be working from 6:30 to 2:30,” I loudly announce to the room of about five people, who are all of different ages and races. As soon as I make this statement, I’m not sure whether my voice has gotten too loud or too small, but I can tell my co-workers are listening.

“Hi, my name is Sarah, and I’

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