Wu Yibing beats a Frenchman in the U.S. Open

Wu Yibing becomes first Chinese man to reach the US Open third round since 1881 In the early hours of Sunday morning, a man who has spent his life in the States of America,…

Wu Yibing beats a Frenchman in the U.S. Open

Wu Yibing becomes first Chinese man to reach the US Open third round since 1881

In the early hours of Sunday morning, a man who has spent his life in the States of America, is making his way towards a record. He has never made it to a Grand Slam final before.

Wu Yibing, who is an American citizen and born of Chinese parents, made history today. For the first time, a man from China has beaten a man from New Jersey.

He was in the second round of the U.S. Open’s third round and it was his third match of the day. It was his first match in five years and his fourth in the last five years.

The 28-year-old had reached the fourth round on three previous occasions. Four times in total, and in each of those four matches, he had played a Frenchman.

“It’s surreal,” he said. “My parents were born in China, so I’m Chinese-American. But I’m also Chinese-French Canadian. My family comes from the city of Quebec.”

The match was a foregone conclusion when the first set began. The Frenchman, who plays in a clay court stadium, was coming off a tough win in the morning session against a young Australian. The Frenchman had served for the first time when a double fault on his own serve allowed the American to break back for a 5-5 lead. The Frenchman had won his four previous matches before the American had stepped onto the court.

The American’s third serve was a perfect double fault, the Frenchman had to serve for the set. The Americans had served for the first set. The second set was an even battle.

But the American found himself on the wrong side of a break in the third set. As he made his way back to his opponent at the other end of the court, the crowd roared when it was announced that the American had broken back to lead by 2-6.

He did and, for the first time all day, the American broke the Frenchman.

“I had three bad serves. I was nervous. I had to fight back. It was a good match.”

The American, a New Jersey resident who plays professional tennis at a club near his hometown, added: “I’ve played against many players. It’s

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